If you’re tired of paying too much for sliced gluten-free bread that you can’t separate or crumbles before your very eyes, here’s my list of 8 of the best gluten-free bread brands to try.

gluten-free bread

Why I’m reviewing packaged gluten-free bread

I asked you what your favorite brands are, and you poured your gluten-avoiding hearts out! I’ve been through many loaves of bread. If it was a total dud (and I’ve tried some total duds as I’m sure we all have), I’m not reviewing it here.

My intention in publishing these reviews is not to stir up controversy, harm anyone’s business, or even support anyone’s business, to be honest. When I posted something on my Facebook page about how Udi’s bread is hard to separate, someone angrily accused me of endangering their business. Clearly, that isn’t my purpose—but I also have no obligation to pretend that reality isn’t what it is.

My intention is simple. I want to help you, the consumer, spend your money wisely.

Packaged gluten-free products are more expensive than conventional products, and always will be. The market for these products is smaller, and the ingredients are more expensive (in part because the market is smaller).

But we’ve come a long way since 2004 when my family first went gluten-free. Back then, we ordered some bizarre gluten-free packaged bread from Canada that not only couldn’t be eaten untoasted but lost its toast within minutes. And the cost was insane. Well, we’ve come a long, long way since then.

Everyone knows that I love baking fresh homemade gluten-free bread. My children adore it when they have it for their school lunches, and my husband loves it because it’s cheaper. Ideally, I’m June Freaking Cleaver and I make every morsel that goes into their precious little mouths.

And then I wake up. Actually, and then they wake up. That isn’t the stuff really of my dreams, but it is of theirs. But it’s just not realistic.

Who is this list for?

This list of 8 packaged kinds of the best gluten-free bread available is primarily for U.S. residents who are already inclined to buy some bread in a store or online. If you absolutely refuse to buy gluten-free bread or refuse to order anything online, then this list may not be very useful to you.

I order plenty of things online, from gluten-free flour to dairy-free hazelnut spread that even in my enormous NY metro area, I can’t find in a store. And since some of the brands you recommended are simply not available in my area, I ordered some of these online.

If you live outside the U.S., as I know many of you do, I’m afraid that many of these brands won’t be available to you. I promise this isn’t turning into a product review blog or anything, and there are still over 900 free gluten-free recipes here on the blog—with more to come next week and forevermore.

So if you’re interested in seeing what my experience has been with your favorite gluten-free bread, or in learning about a few other brands and how they stack up, read on!

What isn’t included?

There will always be a special place in my heart for Udi’s Gluten-Free Bread since it was one of the very first. And their larger loaves of bread are still the king of a properly sized piece of bread that isn’t more melba toast than sandwich bread.

But they changed their formula, and although my children love the taste, I’m going mad trying to separate the slices of some of the loaves. I think that the real difficulty occurs when the loaf has been frozen, defrosted, and then frozen again before purchase. There’s some sort of fusing that goes on and you simply can’t separate the slices whether you try it defrosted or frozen.

So Udi’s is just not on this list. You also won’t find some of the more obscure brands that don’t seem to be intended for mass-market distribution.

Trader Joe’s gluten-free bread also isn’t in this round-up. All 3 of my children agree that it’s just not very good, and the leaves are so tiny that it’s actually quite expensive for what it is. I love that they sell it, though, since it’s so convenient and not frozen. It might be included in a future post.

Specialty types of bread like cinnamon raisin and shaped loaves, baguettes, and pizzas also aren’t included. This is a post about sliced sandwich bread. I reviewed the plainest variety of each bread I could find. In most cases, that’s the “white” bread variety. Sometimes, the whole grain variety was the one I could get my hands on fastest.

I’ve included as much detail as possible about each brand, including price (be sure to pay attention to the relative sizes of the loaves as compared to the price!), availability, ingredients, and other allergens. Please don’t rely upon this information for matters of health, though. It’s just for reference, and ingredients change. Always check your labels!

Every bread in this post holds its shape, can be separated when frozen or fresh, tastes relatively good, and is worth a try. Some are more expensive than others, but in my personal experience (I’m not America’s Test Kitchen with a staff of 100!), none of them crumble or fall apart in that sad, sad way we all know and hate.

If you don’t see your favorite brand at all in this post, please leave a comment and tell everyone what it is, and as much other information as you can. If you’re outside the U.S. and have a favorite, leave a comment, too. You might help your neighbors!

gluten-free bread

Gluten-Free Breads-Three Bakers, Canyon Bakehouse, Franz Gluten Free and Glutino

The first group of 4 loaves of bread is made up of my top picks of the 8. These brands all came highly recommended by readers, and I had only tried two of the four previously. Let’s get into it…

gluten-free bread

Three Bakers Gluten-Free Bread. I really like this bread. The slices separate easily when the loaf is completely frozen or thawed. It’s nice and soft, has a good (mild) flavor, and toasts well. The slices are small, though. They’re average-sized for this group, but they’re small.

To make sandwiches for my kids’ lunches using this bread, I have to use 3 slices for 1 1/2 sandwiches or I have children who are ravenous at the end of the day.

Here are the other details:
  • Size of loaf: 17 ounces
  • The price you should expect to pay: Just under $7/loaf
  • Fresh or frozen: Frozen
  • Availability: Good. My local grocery store (Stop & Shop), my local natural foods store, Gluten-Free Mall online, Amazon.com
  • Other common allergens: eggs
  • Ingredients: water, whole grain brown rice flour, tapioca starch, cornstarch, eggs, corn dextrin, sugar, canola oil, potato flour, honey, baking powder, yeast, rice bran, xanthan gum, salt, vinegar, enzymes (calcium sulfate & enzymes)

gluten-free bread

Like a lot of you, I really like Canyon Bakehouse bread. The bread is soft and the slices are a good shape and relatively good size. The price is pretty good, too, although more expensive than some.

It used to be that whenever I went into Target, I’d pick up a few loaves of bread. They at least used to sell them unfrozen (they’re not fresh, of course), which was a nice change of pace. I haven’t seen their bread in most of my local stores for a long, long time, though.

Their quality control seems to be relatively good, as I’ve never had a loaf with large holes through the center of the slices. But I know that some of you have had that unfortunate Udi’s-like experience and it’s super disappointing.

Here are the other details:
  • Size of loaf: 18 ounces
  • The price you should expect to pay: $5 from the company’s website; $7 frozen at my local natural foods store; upwards of $9 elsewhere
  • Fresh or frozen: both
  • Availability: Poor (in my area). We used to find this bread unfrozen in our local Target, but it no longer seems to be available. I bought a $7 frozen loaf at my local natural foods store.
  • Other common allergens: eggs
  • Ingredients: water, brown rice flour, tapioca flour, whole grain sorghum flour, organic agave syrup, extra virgin olive oil, xanthan gum, organic cane sugar, eggs, egg whites, yeast, sea salt, cultured brown rice flour, organic cane sugar vinegar, enzymes

gluten-free bread

I was surprised to learn that so many of you really like Glutino’s packaged sandwich bread. When we first went gluten-free, Glutino was one of the most readily available brands. Since there wasn’t much competition, we purchased many of their products. But they were expensive, and generally not great-tasting.

I tried the Glutino sandwich bread on your recommendation, though, and I’m really glad I did. The price isn’t great and the availability in my area isn’t either, so I won’t likely be making a habit of buying it. But it tastes good, is soft and toasts well. The loaf is not only small, but the slices are really tiny. But overall I like it.

Here are the other details:
  • Size of loaf: 14.1 ounces
  • The price you should expect to pay: I paid $6.29 at my local natural foods store. The loaf is also quite small.
  • Fresh or frozen: frozen
  • Availability: Poor. My local natural foods store carried Glutino’s multigrain sandwich bread, but not its white loaf. I could not find it anywhere else and even seems to be difficult to find in stock online.
  • Other common allergens: eggs
  • Ingredients: modified tapioca starch, corn starch, potato starch, water, canola oil and/or safflower oil and/or sunflower oil, egg whites, brown rice flour, sugar, tapioca starch, salt, yeast, xanthan gum, glucose-delta-lactone, sodium bicarbonate, modified cellulose, calcium sulfate, enzymes

gluten-free bread

Franz Gluten Free bread was completely unfamiliar to me until a number of readers wrote to me about it. The dedicated gluten-free facilities are located in the Northwestern U.S. (they also make conventional bread in other locations), but you can purchase the bread online directly from Franz.

The Franz bread is pretty much my current favorite of the bunch. It’s soft, toasts pretty well (but not great, honestly) and actually even just smells really good. I don’t really like how short the slices are.

I wouldn’t call the slices “small” because the bread is thickly sliced, so each piece isn’t that small. That means that I don’t have to use 3 slices to make enough lunch for each of my kids, but I can only get about 6 two-slice sandwiches from the whole loaf. So it’s an expensive choice.

Here are the other details:

  • Size of loaf: 18 ounces
  • The price you should expect to pay: $7.58 online directly from the company
  • Fresh or frozen: Fresh (vacuum sealed inner bag)
  • Availability: Fair. I live in the Northeastern U.S., and they don’t distribute in my area. The brand is primarily a Northwestern thing for now, but it’s easy to buy online.
  • Other common allergens: eggs
  • Ingredients: water, brown rice flour, tapioca starch, tapioca syrup, whole grain sorghum flour, xanthan gum, contains 2% or less of each of the following: whole eggs, whole grain amaranth seed, extra virgin olive oil, salt, cultured rice flour, yeast, enzymes

gluten-free bread

Schar, BFree, Rudi’s and Little Northern Bakehouse Gluten-Free Breads

This second group rounds out the list of 8. Two of them were familiar to me (Schar, and Rudi’s) for many years, one I had heard of but hadn’t seen and hadn’t sought out (free) and the fourth was completely unknown (Little Northern Bakehouse).

gluten-free bread

Schar’s products are super expensive—but they’re really good. The slices of this white bread are really small (3 slices for one lunch for sure), and they contain soy which means that they’re off-limits for my oldest. But it’s really a shame since they’re so widely available and it’s her favorite brand. The slices toast well, are soft and smell like well-packaged bread. They even contain sourdough as the third most plentiful ingredient.

They make so many amazing gluten-free specialty products like gluten-free breadsticks, graham crackers, and some nostalgic pasta shapes that no one else does (or likely ever will).

Here are the other details:

  • Size of loaf: 14.1 ounces
  • The price you should expect to pay: A bit more than $7/loaf (almost 50¢/ounce!)
  • Fresh or frozen: Fresh (vacuum sealed inner bag)
  • Availability: Very good. I see Schar products everywhere, online and in brick and mortar stores.
  • Other common allergens: soy
  • Ingredients: water, rice starch, sourdough (water, rice flour), cornstarch, agave syrup, sunflower oil,
    soy protein, modified cellulose, psyllium seeds husks (vegetable fiber), guar gum, millet flour,
    yeast, sugar, quinoa flour, salt, citrus fiber, honey, calcium citrate, niacin, iron, thiamine,
    riboflavin

gluten-free bread

The BFree soft white sandwich loaf solves the small-slices problem that plagues many if not most of the gluten-free breads in this list. But I count 10 slices in one loaf, which for my family of 3 children means that I’d have to use one loaf a day to make lunches. That makes this bread twice as expensive as most of the others—with the exception of those slices that are so small that I have to use 3 slices per lunch.

But, the bread is really good. In addition to being soft and toasting well, it reminds me of Arnold’s rye bread slices of my youth. Hearty, chewy, and just plain good.

Here are the other details:

  • Size of loaf: 14.1 ounces
  • The price you should expect to pay: About $6.50 on Glutenfreemall.com
  • Fresh or frozen: Frozen.
  • Availability: Poor—at least for me. The company is located in Ireland, and I’m not sure how much market penetration they have in the U.S. But hopefully, they’re everywhere in the U.K.!
  • Other common allergens: none
  • Ingredients: water, potato flour, corn starch, tapioca starch, white rice flour, buckwheat flour, xanthan gum, cellulose, rice bran, yeast, pea protein, canola oil, salt, sourdough (fermented quinoa, rice, and maize flour), psyllium husk, canola oil, agar-agar, citric acid (a mold inhibitor), malic acid (a mold inhibitor), tartaric acid (a mold inhibitor), ascorbic acid, tartaric acid (a mold inhibitor), ascorbic acid.

-Rudis Gluten-free Bakery

gluten-free bread

Since they’ve never carried Rudi’s at our wholesale club (we belong to BJ’s Wholesale), we don’t buy it very often. But the slices are a fair, non-melba-toast size, the bread is consistently good, and the price can be relatively reasonable.

They often have their seeded varieties more available for some reason, and my youngest is a total pain about that. No seeds or no go. Or major dramatic overreaction, I should say.

Here are the other details:
  • Size of loaf: 18.5 ounces
  • The price you should expect to pay: $6.25 when you buy 8 from Walmart online; Over $7 elsewhere.
  • Fresh or frozen: Frozen
  • Availability: Good. My local grocery store (Stop & Shop), my local natural foods store, Whole Foods and many other places including many Walmart stores
  • Other common allergens: eggs
  • Ingredients: Water, potato extract, non-GMO, and expeller pressed canola oil, rice starch, rice flour, evaporated cane syrup, inulin, bamboo fiber, honey, sea salt, molasses, egg whites, xanthan gum, yeast, distilled vinegar, natural enzymes.

The Little Northern Bakehouse seeds and grains

gluten-free bread

The Little Northern Bakehouse seeds and grains loaf is all we could find in the store, and I didn’t want to order online. The ingredients below are for that loaf.

They do have a “white wide slice loaf” that I’m really interested in trying and will likely order online since my only complaint about this bread (other than the relative lack of availability and the high price) is the size of the bread. It’s just small.

 

Here are the other details:
  • Size of loaf: 17.1 ounces
  • The price you should expect to pay: About $8 a loaf if you can find it
  • Fresh or frozen: Frozen
  • Availability: Poor. I’ve only found Little Northern Bakehouse for sale locally at The Fresh Market. I can’t even find a place to order it online, as Amazon charges $18 for shipping!
  • Other common allergens: none
  • Ingredients: Water, gluten-free flour blend (modified tapioca starch, potato starch, whole brown rice flour, whole sorghum flour, corn starch), seed and grain mix (sunflower seeds, whole millet, brown rice, flax seeds, chia seeds, pumpkin seeds), sunflower oil, dextrose, psyllium, cane sugar, yeast, pea fiber, modified cellulose, salt, rice bran, cultured cane sugar, vinegar, cellulose gum.

Your turn now! What’s the best gluten free breads you’ve ever bought (sliced, in a package)? Save your pizza and rolls recommendation for another day. I promise we’ll get to that.